Electric Blanket Vs. Space Heater - Which One Should You Buy?

The advantages of an electric blanket over a space heater are worth considering, even if you have central heating or only need to use these items occasionally. Cost, utility, aesthetics, and safety are just a few of the factors to take into account.

The decision between these two depends on the type of space you want to heat, the amount of money you want to spend on electricity, and the number of people who would benefit from this heating option.

Electric Blanket

Overview – Electric Blankets vs. Space Heaters

Whether you should get a battery heated blanket or a space heater entirely relies on your needs. You should save money by not purchasing either if you believe you can do without them both. If, however, the weather does not allow for additional layers, use a blanket that can keep you warm instead.

In that it can quickly and reasonably heat an entire room, a space heater is equally magical. Depending on your objectives, you can choose to have both in your home and employ each one as necessary.

What are Electric Blankets?

Electric blankets are classified as household appliances even though they resemble and function like bedding because they plug into a wall and use your circuits for power. Through the fabric, there are tiny, thin wires that conduct heat, which warms the battery powered heated blanket and quickly warms you.

Timer devices are now possible thanks to recent advances, which is a crucial security measure. Another recent development is the introduction of wireless devices that can be operated by remote control and don't require a power outlet.

The blanket shouldn't feel any different from a typical piece of bedding aside from the heat it provides. After removing the plastic temperature dial, many blankets can even be thrown in the washing machine.

 

Electric Blanket with Wire

 

Wattage

Around 200 to 400 watts are required by a typical battery powered heated blanket. Electric blankets typically use a small amount of energy to distribute heat through internal cables. They typically cost four cents per hour, as opposed to some space heaters that can cost as much as fifteen cents.

Choice's calculations indicate that running a single-bed electric blanket for three months, including preheating it, should cost about $20 per season.

 

Construction

These units' interiors are comparatively typical for the sector. The heating element is made up of wires that are evenly distributed throughout the fabric layers and heat up when the blanket is turned on. The exterior material can be different; frequently, it is soft fleece, but you can also find them made of acrylic, wool, and other fabrics.

Unique Features

These can be found in an almost unlimited array of colors and designs, as well as a wide range of sizes to accommodate any bed. The automatic shut-off and timer features found on more recent models increase safety and reduce energy costs.